Rudy Gobert did exactly what a center is taught to do: He put his hand up and tipped the ball in the basket.

The result of his heads-up play led to the Jazz defeating the Kings 110-109 in overtime Sunday. Only the play wasn’t as simple as it looked.

Initially ruled basket interference, it appeared Sacramento was going to Cheap Jerseys And Hats From China escape with a home win. Officials conferred, deliberated and finally decided Gobert’s basket counted.

“I didn’t know if I had time to get the rebound or not, so when I saw the ball on the side of the rim I just tipped it in,” Gobert said after the game. “I’m from Europe, so I thought it was good.”

There is no basket interference in Europe. Players can play the ball directly off the rim, sometimes even stealing points from their teammates.

Jennings joined in on the fun by changing his bio to get rid of any Knicks affiliation. He also tweeted a pair of eyes (like Isaiah Thomas and Andre Drummond did) but deleted it after getting weird messages from fans, although said, “I’m going to do it again.”

Cryptic emojis with NBA players isn’t a new thing. Most fans remember Cheap Jerseys China NHL a few summers ago when Chandler Parsons started the Emoji War of 2015. Parsons’ tweet was during free agency, which is the only other time in the NBA season that matches the intensity of the trade deadline. Fans and reporters are reading into every thing, so players have fun at their expense.

But while emojis clearly play a large part in all of this, we can’t leave out all of the profile changes as well. Players have added another dimension to the wackiness by changing their bio, profile picture, header, and who they follow/unfollow.